Events

WELCOME

Bucks County was once called the “Genius Belt” because of its ability to attract and
hold creative virtuosos such as Dorothy Parker, S.J. Perelman, Oscar Hammerstein,
George S. Kaufman, Moss Hart, James Michener, and Pearl S. Buck. It remains
a place where top minds congregate, and Delaware Valley College has become
a focal point for their ideas, dreams, and visions.

Our mission is to show that the power and force of intellect can improve the world.

It’s a world that needs improvement but is slow to change.

To assist with this precarious dilemma, Delaware Valley College
has convened a series of symposia called The Precarious Alliance.

In this series, now in its third year, problem-solvers come together to
discuss the myriad breakdowns between human networks and the natural world.
Through an interdisciplinary approach and unshackled debate, logical,
sustainable solutions are sought.

The topic for this year is “Energy in Transition.”

Over the course of three days, attendees will hear from a full slate of filmmakers, authors, academics, inventors and others who care, think, and act.
Many defy convention as they seek to remake and recreate.

Scott Brusaw is one such person. He wants to harvest energy from our highways by
building solar cells into them, and to allow these same roads to serve as data grids.

Another is Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, the first global grassroots
climate change initiative. He helped lead over a thousand demonstrations,
across all fifty states, to protest climate change.

All of our speakers bring important messages to campus, and they are to be
commended for their ability to spread knowledge and promote discussion.
They are able to come to DelVal thanks to the Burpee Foundation, Inc. and the
Margaret A. Cargill Foundation, Inc., a supporter of the college’s environmental
programs. Working together, the College and its invited speakers and sponsors
are taking important steps toward keeping the world alive and healthy.

As you watch and listen, consider your personal role in this Precarious Alliance,
an alliance that is critical to our future and the future of every form of
life on the planet. What you see and hear should increase your awareness
of issues that too often are conveniently avoided.

If the Precarious Alliance can do that, while challenging the notion that things
tend to get better on their own, then our symposium will have served its purpose.

Dr. Joseph S. Brosnan
President, Delaware Valley College

Day 1

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014

Please note: All events associated with The Precarious Alliance
are hosted on the campus of Delaware Valley College in Doylestown, PA.
For same-day directions or information, please contact the
co-directors of the symposium at precariousalliance@delval.edu.

4:00–10:00 PM • REGISTRATION & FILM SCREENING
Life Sciences Building

4:00–6:00 PM • Lobby • Registration & Hors d’oeuvres

6:00–7:30 PM • Auditorium
Screening: Switch: Discover the Future of Energy (2012)
Auditorium, Life Sciences Building

7:30–9:00 PM • Auditorium • Post-Screening Panel Discussion
Moderator: Michael Stamps, Associate Professor, English, Delaware Valley College

Scheduled Panelists:
Harry Lynch, Director, Switch: Discover the Future of Energy

Dr. Brian Black, Professor of History and Environmental Science,
Penn State Altoona

Seamus McGraw, Journalist and author of The End of Country:
Dispatches from the Frack Zone

9:00 PM • Lobby • Meet-the-Author & Book-Signing

Note

“ENERGY ON DISPLAY”
Throughout the duration of our symposium, several energy-related
exhibits, posters, and demonstrations will be on display in the
second-floor atrium of the Life Sciences Building.

Day 2

THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014

8:00–10:40 AM • MORNING PROCEEDINGS
Life Sciences Building

8:00–9:00 AM • Lobby • Registration & Refreshments

9:00–9:10 AM • Auditorium • Welcome Address
Tanya Casas, Associate Professor, Sociology and
Academic Co-Director of Graduate Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College

9:10–9:20 AM • Auditorium • President’s Address
Joseph S. Brosnan, President, Delaware Valley College

9:20–10:40 AM • Auditorium • Keynote Address
Life Sciences Building

WOODROW W. CLARK II, MA3, Ph.D.

Qualitative Economist, Founder and Managing Partner, Clark Strategic Partners

“The Green Industrial Revolution: Smart Green Cities”
Since the earth is “round”—not “flat”—dramatic weather changes
impact the world. Due to climate change, cities, regions, and nations
are overwhelmed in terms of costs ranging from externalities to life-cycle factors.
The solutions range from energy efficiency and conservation to renewable sources
of power and storage, such as hydrogen fuel cell cars and their refueling stations
as applied to transportation, water, waste and WiFi integrated infrastructures.
The time has come, with extensive documented evidence, for cities and
communities to be “smart” in terms of their technological efficiencies;
and be “green” in terms of their reduction of carbon emission and gases through
hydrogen fuel cells. The shift from fossil fuels to the use of renewable energy,
as well as advancing vegetation, water, and waste systems, must be done today.
Tomorrow (defined often as 20–30 years away) will be too late. The key is to
tie all of these factors together for establishing Smart Green (Sustainable)
Cities in measurable ways with proven comprehensive data that can be
monitored and evaluated. The goal should be to establish standardized
financing and performance reviews for all cities.

10:45–12:00 PM • BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Life Sciences Building

Session 1.1 • “Greening the Interior Architecture Curriculum” • Room 102
Moderator: Cathy Davies, Assistant Professor, Food Science, Nutrition and
Management, Delaware Valley College

Thelma Lazo-Flores, Associate Professor and Director of Interior Architecture
and Landscape Architecture Programs, Chatham University

Kathleen A. Hrabovsky, Adjunct Faculty Member, Chatham University

Session 1.2 • “Natural Gas Pipelines: Energy in Transmission” • Room 103
Moderator: David Snyder, Associate Professor, History, Delaware Valley College

Roberta Winters, League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania
“Environmental Impacts: Fragmentation and Methane”

Faith Zerbe, Delaware Riverkeeper Network
“Challenge and Conflict”

Lynda Farrell, PSCoalition.org
“Knowledge and Advocacy”

Session 1.3 • Pop Culture and Energy • Room 104
“‘We Scare Because We Care’:
Energy, the Environment, and Entertainment in
Disney/Pixar’s Monsters, Inc. and WALL·E”

Michael W. Stamps, Associate Professor, English, Delaware Valley College
Brian Lutz, Instructor, English, Delaware Valley College

This special pop culture presentation will explore the problematic confluence
of contemporary energy policy and environmental philosophy in such
popular Disney/Pixar films as Monsters, Inc. and WALL·E.

Moderator: Jessica McCall, Assistant Professor, English, Delaware Valley College

Session 1.4 • “Transition Towns” • Room 105
Moderator: Tanya Casas, Associate Professor, Sociology and
Academic Co-Director, Graduate Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College

Marie Goodwin, TimeBank Media; Transition Town Media

Philip Barnes, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Delaware,
School of Public Policy and Administration

Amy Johnson, Director of Outreach and Community Relations for Greener Partners

Ellen Morfei, Transition Town Media; TimeBank Media

Sari Steuber, President, Transition Town Media

12:00–2:15 PM • LUNCH & PLENARY PANEL
Moumgis Auditorium

“The Future of Energy … Is Now”

SCHEDULED PANELISTS

Thurman Brendlinger, Energy & Tobacco Project Director, Clean Air Council

Adam Garber, Field Director, PennEnvironment

John Fagnant, Technical Lead, Regenedyne

Tucker Perkins, Chief Business Development Officer,
Propane Education & Research Council

Steven J. Santarsiero, State Representative,
31st Legislative District, Bucks County

Moderator: David Snyder, Associate Professor, History and Academic Co-Director,
Graduate Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College

2:30–3:45 PM • BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Life Sciences Building

Session 1.5 • “Environmental Policy and Energy Extraction in Pennsylvania”
Room 102

Moderator: David Snyder, Associate Professor, History and Academic Co-Director,
Graduate Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College

Brook Lenker, Executive Director, FracTracker Alliance
“Fracking in America: Insights on Unconventional Oil and Gas Extraction”

David Snyder, Academic Co-Director, Graduate Policy Studies,
Delaware Valley College

“Boomtowns: Communities and Fossil Fuel Extraction in Pennsylvania”

James A. Schmid, President, Schmid & Company, Inc., Consulting Ecologists
“How Precarious Is Environmental Protection in Pennsylvania?”

Session 1.6 • “Energy Policy, Practice, and Transition” • Room 103
Moderator: Tanya Casas, Academic Co-Director, Graduate Policy Studies,
Delaware Valley College

Robert J. Mason, Professor, Geography & Urban Studies, Temple University
“Environmental Shocks as Policy Drivers: Implications for
Emerging Energy Policy”

Joseph Nyangon and Andrea Ruótolo, Ph.D. Researchers, Center for
Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Delaware

“Understanding the Drivers, Process, and Practice of Sustainability
in the Argentina and Brazil’s Energy Transition”

Sandra George O’Neil, Chair, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Curry College
“Industrial Solar in the Suburbs”

Session 1.7 • “We Must Question the Necessity of Energy End Uses” • Room 104
Moderator: Janet Klaessig, Electronic Resources Librarian, Delaware Valley College

Andrew Rudin, Energy Management Consultant

3:45–4:45 PM • COFFEE & REFRESHMENTS
Lobby, Life Sciences Building

5:00–6:30 PM • Keynote Address
Auditorium, Life Sciences Building

BILL McKIBBEN

Author, Environmental Activist, Founder of 350.org

“Updates from the Frontlines of the Climate Fight”

In this presentation, Bill McKibben will describe the science of
climate change and talk about the inspiring global movement that he
co-founded to help change the world’s understanding of its peril,
and to spur the reforms necessary to get the planet back to safety.

Day 3

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

8:00–9:00 AM • Lobby • Registration & Refreshments

9:00–9:15 AM • Auditorium • Welcome Address, Day 3
Dr. Christopher Tipping, Associate Professor, Biology, Delaware Valley College

BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Life Sciences Building

Session 2.1 • 9:15–10:30 PM • “Energy Transition and Pro-Action” • Room 102
Moderator: Sarah Penniman, Distance Learning and Graduate Studies Librarian,
Delaware Valley College

Debbie Kasper, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Hiram College
“A Theory of Social Change for Guiding Inquiry about and
Action for Societal Transitions”

Joni Carley, Global Dialogue Institute, Haverford College
“Cultural Capital: An Invisible Energy Factor”

Session 2.2 • 9:15–10:30 PM
“Off Grid 101: Never Be Alone in the Dark Again” • Room 103
Facilitator: Colin Chambers, Environmental Health and Safety Specialist,
Delaware Valley College

Len Radziewicz, President, Gannet Mechanical, Inc.

Session 2.3 • 9:15–10:30 PM
“A Panel of Policy Studies Graduate Students” • Room 104
Moderator: David Snyder, Associate Professor, History, Delaware Valley College

Danielle Hudak, ‘12, Graduate Student, Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College
“Biofuel, Land Grabbing, and Food Insecurity:
The Impacts of a New Type of Sustainable Energy”

Maggie Villari, ‘13, Graduate Student, Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College
“A Crude Awakening: Oil Spill Policy in the United States”

Autumn Canfield, ‘13, Graduate Student, Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College
“Trash-licity”

Richard Wetzel, ‘13, Graduate Student, Policy Studies, Delaware Valley College
“Changes from an Extractive Economy”

10:45–12:00 PM • Keynote Address
Auditorium, Life Sciences Building

SCOTT BRUSAW

President and CEO, Solar Roadways

12:15–2:00 PM • Luncheon and Plenary Panel 2
Moumgis Auditorium

“The Next Step: Energy Policy”

Moderator: Michael W. Stamps, Associate Professor, English,
Delaware Valley College

SCHEDULED PANELISTS

Chuck Hanna, VP for the Mid-Atlantic Region, Constellation, An Exelon Company

Other panelists to be announced

2:00 PM • Closing Remarks
Moumgis Auditorium

Solar Roadways: The Road to a Greener Future”

Back when the phrase “Global Warming” began gaining popularity,
Scott Brusaw and his wife Julie started batting around the idea of replacing
asphalt and concrete surfaces with solar panels that could be driven upon.
The Brusaws began their brainstorming by asking, “What if we made a
section of road out of a highly durable material that housed solar cells
to collect energy, which could pay for the cost of the panel?”

In this presentation, Scott Brusaw will describe how Solar Roadways
has the capability of eliminating 75% of greenhouse gases, while rebuilding
our crumbling infrastructure, making it electric vehicle-friendly, creating a
Smart Grid, cleaning storm water, eliminating the need for salt or chemicals
to melt road ice, protecting wildlife, and making driving safer.

A Sustainability Symposium
“Energy in Transition”

Delaware Valley College • Doylestown, PA 18901

April 2–4, 2014

 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014

4:00–6:00 PM • EARLY REGISTRATION & RECEPTION EVENT • Lobby, Life Sciences Building, Delaware Valley College

6:00–7:30 PM • FILM SCREENING • Auditorium, Life Sciences Building
Switch: Discover the Future of Energy (2012)

7:30 PM • POST-SCREENING PANEL DISCUSSION • Auditorium, Life Sciences Building
This moderated panel discussion of the future of energy will feature Harry Lynch, Director of the film Switch: Discover the Future of Energy; Dr. Brian Black, Professor of History and Environmental Science, Penn State, Altoona, and Seamus McGraw, journalist and author of The End of Country: Dispatches from the Frack Zone.

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014

8:00–9:00 AM • REGISTRATION + REFRESHMENTS • Lobby, Life Sciences Building

9:00–9:15 AM • WELCOME ADDRESS • Auditorium, Life Sciences Building
Dr. Tanya Casas, Asst. Prof., Liberal Arts, Delaware Valley College

9:15–10:30 AM • KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Woodrow W. Clark II MA3, Ph.D.
Auditorium, Life Sciences Building, Delaware Valley College

10:45–12:00 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 1a • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“Greening the Interior Architecture Curriculum”
Thelma Lazo-Flores and Kathleen A. Hrabovsky

10:45–12:00 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 1b • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“An Ounce of Prevention: Pipeline Education and Safety in the Commonwealth”
Julanne Skinner, et al.

10:45–12:00 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 1c • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“Greening Buildings and Homes”
Greg Hofstetter, “EcoGreen Hotels”
Sandra George O’Neil, “Industrial Solar in the Suburbs”

10:45–12:00 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 1d • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“Transition Towns”
Marie Goodwin, Philip Barnes, Amy Johnson, Ellen Morfei, and Sari Steuber

12:30–2:00 PM • LUNCH + PLENARY PANEL • Moumgis Auditorium, Delaware Valley College
“The Future of Energy … Is Now”
This moderated plenary panel will feature Thurman Brendlinger, Energy & Tobacco Project Director, Clean Air Council; Adam Garber, Field Director, PennEnvironment; Christopher Griffin, Operations & Finance, Regenedyne; Tucker Perkins, Chief Business Development Officer, Propane Education & Research Council

2:15–3:30 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 2a • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“Environmental Policy and Energy Extraction in Pennsylvania”
Brook Lenker, “Insights on Unconventional Oil and Gas Extraction”
Dr. David Snyder, “Boomtowns”
James A. Schmid, “How Precarious is Environmental Protection in Pennsylvania?”

2:15–3:30 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 2b • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“Energy Policy, Practice, and Transition”
Robert J. Mason, “Environmental Shocks as Policy Drivers: Implications for Emerging
Energy Policy”
Joseph Nyangon and Andrea Ruótolo, “Understanding the Drivers, Process, and Practice
of Sustainability in the Argentina and Brazil’s Energy Transition”

2:15–3:30 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 2c • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
Workshop
Andrew Rudin, “We Must Question the Necessity of Energy End Uses”

3:30–4:45 PM • COFFEE + REFRESHMENTS • Lobby, Life Sciences Building

3:30–4:45 PM • TOUR ENERGY EXHIBIT HALL • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]

5:00–6:30 PM • KEYNOTE ADDRESS • Auditorium, Life Sciences Building
Bill McKibben, [“Title TBA”]

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2014

8:00–9:00 AM • REGISTRATION + REFRESHMENTS • Lobby, Life Sciences Building

9:00–9:15 AM • DAY 2 WELCOME ADDRESS • Auditorium, Life Sciences Building
Dr. Chris Tipping, Assoc. Prof., Biology, Delaware Valley College

9:15–10:30 PM • BREAKOUT SESSION, No. 3a • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“Energy Transition and Pro-action”
Debbie Kasper, “A Theory of Social Change for Guiding Inquiry about and Action for
Societal Transitions”

Joni Carley, “Cultural Capital: An Invisible Energy Factor”

9:15–10:30 PM • WORKSHOP, No. 3b • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
Len Radziewicz, “Off Grid 101: Never Be Alone in the Dark Again”

9:15–10:30 PM • WORKSHOP, No. 3c • Life Sciences Building, [Room TBA]
“A Panel of Policy Studies Graduate Students”
Danielle Hudak, [“Title TBA”]
Maggie Villari , [“Title TBA”]
Autumn Canfield, [“Title TBA”]

10:45–12:00 PM • KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Auditorium, Life Sciences Building
Scott Brusaw, Solar Roadways, [“Title TBA”]

12:15–1:30 PM • CLOSING REMARKS/PLENARY SESSION 2 + LUNCH
Moumgis Auditorium, Delaware Valley College

 

Bill McKibben

Portrait of Bill McKibben, author and activist. photo ©Nancie BattagliaBill McKibben is one of America’s best known environmentalists. As a bestselling author, he has written books that, over the last quarter century, have shaped public perception–and public action–on climate change, alternative energy, and the need for more localized economies. McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the first big global grassroots climate change initiative.

McKibben’s seminal books include The End of Nature, widely seen as the first book on climate change for a general audience, and Deep Economy, a bold challenge to move beyond “growth” as the paramount economic ideal and to pursue prosperity in a more local direction — an idea that is the cornerstone of much sustainability discourse today. In total, McKibben has penned ten books. A former New Yorker staff writer and Guggenheim Fellow, he writes for various magazines, including Rolling Stone, The Atlantic, National Geographic and The New York Review of Books.

In 2007, McKibben founded stepitup07.org to demand that Congress curb carbon emissions that would cut global warming pollution 80 percent by 2050. On April 14, 2007, as part of the effort, McKibben helped lead over a thousand demonstrations, across all 50 states, a watershed moment described as the largest day of protest against climate change in the nation’s history.

Woodrow W. Clark II MA3, Ph.D

Dr. Clark, a long-time advocate for the environment and renewable energy, is an internationally recognized author, lecturer, public speaker and advisor specializing in sustainable communities. He was one of the contributing scientists to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (UNIPCC), which as an organization was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in December 2007 along with Al Gore and his film “An Inconvenient Truth”.

In 1980, Woody founded a mass media company in San Francisco, CA, Clark Communications, specializing in the production and distribution of documentary and educational films focused on social issues such as sexual harassment, school violence, health issues and baby boomers. Today is an active member today in the Producers Guild of America. For six months in 1994. Dr. Clark was a Fulbright Fellow at AAlborg University in Denmark, and then returned back to Northern California to be Manager of Strategic Planning for Energy Technology Transfer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 1994-1999 at University of California and U.S. Department of Energy.

Returning to AAlborg University from 1999-2000, Dr. Clark became a Visiting Professor of Science, Technology and Entrepreneurship and associate at the NOVI Science Park. However the three-year contract was cut short because California Governor Gray Davis’ senior staff asked him to return immediately to California to help with the energy crisis in 2000 and be the Governor’s Advisor on Renewable Energy, Emerging Technologies, and Finance (2000-2003). Then the “recall” came in 2003 and while being asked to remain in State Government, Clark instead founded in 2003 Clark Strategic Partners (CSP), an environmental and renewable energy consulting firm using his political-economic expertise to guide, advice and implement public and private clients worldwide for sustainable smart green communities ranging from colleges and universities to shopping malls, office buildings and film studios.

Clark has six books and 50+ peer-reviewed articles that concern economics and policies for global sustainable communities in the “Green Industrial Revolution” (GIR) with Grant Cooke which will become a book in 2013 (publisher to be selected). His newest book is The Next Economics (Springer Press, December 2012). Clark and Cooke are starting a series of books on “The Green Industrial Revolution” focused on sustainable communities in different regions and countries around the world. From 2011-2012, Dr. Clark is an Academic Specialist at UCLA in the Cross-Disciplinary Scholars in Science and Technology (CSST) program and ran his company Clark Strategic Partners. He earned three masters’ degrees from three different universities in Illinois and his PhD at University of California, Berkeley on “Violence in Public Schools.” Woody lives with his wife, and their 5 year-old son in Southern California.

Scott Brusaw, Co-Inventor and Co-founder of Solar Roadways

BRUSAWS-and-PANELSBack when the phrase “Global Warming” began gaining popularity, Scott Brusaw and his wife Julie started batting around the idea of replacing asphalt and concrete surfaces with solar panels that could be driven upon. The Brusaws began their brainstorming by asking, “What if we made a section of road out of a highly durable material that housed solar cells to collect energy, which could pay for the cost of the panel?” Which then led them to consider, “What if we added LEDs to ‘paint’ the road lines from beneath, lighting up the road for safer night time driving?” And then, “What if we added a heating element in the surface (like the defrosting wire in the rear window of our cars) to prevent snow/ice accumulation in northern climates?” Ideas and possibilities continued to roll in and the Solar Roadway project was born.

The guiding principle of the Solar Roadways Project is to replace petroleum-based asphalt roads and surfaces—whether interstate highways, downtown streets, residential lanes, or dirt and gravel roads—with a series of structurally engineered Solar Road Panels that can be driven on by cars and trucks and collect solar energy that can in turn be used to power nearby homes, stores and businesses, amusement parks, schools, and remote military locations. Furthermore, the Solar Roadway has the capacity to evolve into an intelligent, self-healing, decentralized (and secure) power grid, which would allow homes or businesses to receive power and data signals through their parking lots and driveways.

When multiple Solar Road Panels are interconnected, the intelligent Solar Roadway is formed—and everyone wins. Everyone everywhere has power. No more power shortages or outages. There will be less need for fossil fuels, less dependency upon foreign oil, and much less pollution. Imagine an additional long-term advantage: A system of electric roads that allows all-electric vehicles to recharge anywhere, including public rest stops and parking lots. Electric cars would then have the same range as gasoline-powered vehicles, making internal combustion engines obsolete and ending and our dependency on oil.

Scott Brusaw is the co-inventor and co-founder of Solar Roadways, together with his wife, Julie. Scott is an electrical engineer (MSEE) with over twenty years of industry experience, including serving as the Director of Research and Development at a manufacturing facility in Ohio, standing as a voting member of NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association), and developing several networked control systems from the ground up. Scott has multiple patents and his hardware and software have been sold internationally. Julie has a Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology from Humboldt State University in northern California.

In 2009, the Brusaws received a contract from the Federal Highway Administration to build the first ever Solar Road Panel prototype. During the course of its construction, they learned many lessons and discovered new and better ways to approach this project. These methods and discoveries are discussed throughout their website: www.solarroadways.com

Eventbrite - The Precarious Alliance

CONTACT INFORMATION

Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

precariousalliance@delval.edu
215.489.4865

Master’s in Environmental and Agricultural Policy at DelVal